It’s just an observation

When I was younger, one of the jokes my then 80-year old grandmother delightedly told me was:  A woman was just waking up from an operation in the hospital recovery room, still drowsy from the anesthesia.  She lifted her head slightly and looked around the room.  There were two men dressed in white standing against the wall talking to each other.  After a few minutes, one of them walked over to her bed, lifted the covers, looked her up and down, then returned and continued talking to the other man.  A minute or so later, the second guy approached her bed and did the same thing.  As he lifted the covers, she said, “hey, what am I here for, an operation or observation?”  The guy said, “I don’t know lady, we’re just the painters.”

Call me simple-minded, but the joke still gives me a mild kick.  (As an aside, in high school, two of the many jobs I had were 1) as a porter in a hospital, where I swabbed the deck of the main parts of the hospital, including the recovery room, and 2) as a painter.  I never had such an observation.)

There are different reasons for being observant.  When my brother and I rode bicycles across part of the country, he would observe things that passed me by.  Our attentions drifted on different aspects of the trip.  Various observations, different perspectives, and neither right or wrong.  They just are.  No conclusions were drawn.

How Sweet? Way too sweet.

Not to overdo posts about the country where I’m living, but I’ve observed something that does not require lifting any blankets.  Observation: a significant portion of young Chinese children, especially girls, need to wear eye glasses.

Requiring glasses to see well early in life sure seems like a genetic defect.  It’s not natural.  Some have drawn the conclusion that the unusually high percent of myopia is due to the social environment of studying too much and being indoors.  That theory doesn’t float my logic boat.

already needing glasses?

The author of Deep Nutrition, mentioned in a post a few weeks ago, makes a convincing case that the two most widely used toxic food ingredients — sugar and vegetable oil, are having damaging effects on not only us but also our offsprings.

Most of us have heard that processed sugars are not good, but we still eat sweet stuff in humungous amounts.  The Chinese have kicked Western habits into high gear and have started to sweeten everything, to a sickening degree.  And, they use massive amounts of vegetable oil as a staple kitchen item.  These oils have been used now for decades.  Vegetable and seed oils are sold in every mini-market in 3-liter containers.  They cook everything in this oil, including sugar.

I try to steer clear of these oils but it’s damn difficult. It’s used to cook everything.

The production of vegetable and seed oils requires about 20 different processes including the use of high heat and deodorization, which alters the molecular makeup.  Consistent consumption of these toxic oils, the author argues, negatively affects our chromosomal makeup.  (Oils from olive, coconut, and peanut are extracted without heat.)

I’m not making a connection here.  It’s just an observation, with a dash of logic.  But then again, I’m just the painter lady.

This “original” buttermilk “let the taste return to nature” is hardly natural.  The store clerk told me it had no sugar but it was so sweet I had to throw away.

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